OneTouch Blood Glucose Meters - Drugs.com

Author: Faunus

Nov. 28, 2023

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Tags: Consumer Electronics

OneTouch Blood Glucose Meters

Medically reviewed by Leigh Ann Anderson, PharmD. Last updated on Nov 22, 2023.

What are OneTouch Glucose Meters?

OneTouch is a brand of small portable blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring systems that can be used by patients with diabetes.

Examples of OneTouch meters include:

OneTouch systems typically consist of the meter, user guide, and a carrying case. Test strips, control solutions and lancets are usually sold separately. Each meter offers different features, such as size of screen, memory, and result displays. 

User guides and videos for each type of meter are available online at the OneTouch website. For any questions, you can call LifeScan / One Touch Customer Care at 1-800-227-8862 or ask questions through their live chat or chat assistant online. Customer service and warranty support are still available for discontinued products listed above.

Always review your specific blood glucose meter owner's manual prior to use. If you have have questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Comparison of OneTouch Blood Glucose Meters

OneTouch Verio Reflect

  • Contains a "Blood Sugar Mentor" feature that offers personalized guidance based on blood sugar level results. Uses the OneTouch Verio test strips. A portable and compact design with carrying case. Includes 2 lithium batteries.
  • Has a color screen (ColorSure technology) to help identify when your blood sugar numbers are in or out of range. Scans a tiny blood sample 500 times to provide accurate readings. Reported result range 20-600 mg/dL. Results in 5 seconds.
  • Syncs your blood glucose on the downloadable OneTouch Reveal mobile app, and the Blood Sugar Mentor offers additional tips; Bluetooth enabled; you can share blood sugar numbers if you choose. 
  • Typically offers the lowest co-pay on most health plans. Covered on traditional Medicare Part B and $0 copay with most supplemental insurance.
  • Cash price is $28 on manufacturer's website (as of Nov. 2023).

A complete OneTouch Verio Supplies kit is also available for purchase and might be a good option if you are just starting out, as it has everything you need for everyday blood sugar monitoring and testing.

  • It contains a OneTouch Verio Reflect meter, OneTouch Delica Plus lancing device, 60ct OneTouch Verio test strips, and a 60ct OneTouch Delica Plus lancets 30g.
  • The OneTouch Delica Plus lancing device and lancets can make testing virtually pain-free, with test results in as a little as 5 seconds.
  • Price is $66.99 on manufacturer's website (as of Nov. 2023).

OneTouch Verio Flex

  • The OneTouch Verio Flex meter is a compact slim meter that has a color screen (ColorSure technology) to help identify when your blood sugar numbers are in or out of range. Uses the OneTouch Verio test strips. Reported result range 20-600 mg/dL. Results in 5 seconds.
  • The kit includes the meter, OneTouch Delica Plus lancing device, 10 sterile lancets, carrying case, and owner’s manual (test strips sold separately). Includes 1 lithium battery.
  • Syncs your blood glucose on the downloadable OneTouch Reveal mobile app; Bluetooth enabled; you can share blood sugar numbers if you choose. 
  • Typically offers the lowest co-pay on most health plans. Covered on traditional Medicare Part B and $0 copay with most supplemental insurance.
  • Cash price is $26 on manufacturer's website (as of Nov. 2023).

OneTouch UltraPlus Flex

  • The OneTouch UltraPlus Flex meter is a compact slim meter that has a color screen (ColorSure) to help identify when your blood sugar numbers are in or out of range. It scans a tiny blood sample 500 times for accurate results. Reported result range 20-600 mg/dL. Results in 5 seconds.
  • Uses the OneTouch UltraPlus test strips. Lancing device, lancets, and test strips all sold separately. A lithium battery is included.
  • Syncs your blood glucose on the downloadable OneTouch Reveal mobile app; Bluetooth enabled; you can share blood sugar numbers if you choose. 
  • Cash price is $22 on manufacturers website (as of Nov. 2023).

OneTouch Ultra 2

  • The OneTouch Ultra 2 blood glucose meter can provide blood glucose results within five seconds. Records results for before and after meals. Reported result range 20-600 mg/dL. Results in 5 seconds. 
  • Larger, easy to read display. The monitor can provide before and after glucose averages for 7, 14, and 30 days and trends can be monitored. 
  • In addition, the effects of food choices and portion control over time can be viewed.
  • Kit includes: meter, OneTouch Delica Plus lancing device, lancets, and owner's manual (test strips and carrying case sold separately). It comes with a backlight for easier nighttime viewing. Two lithium batteries included. 
  • Typically offers the lowest co-pay on most health plans. Always covered on traditional Medicare Part B and $0 copay with most supplemental insurance.
  • Cash price is $32.99 on manufacturers website (as of Nov. 2023).

Why Use a Blood Glucose Monitor?

Blood glucose monitoring plays an important role in diabetes control. Uncontrolled blood sugar can cause expensive complications in term of money and health. A long-term study showed that keeping blood glucose levels close to normal can reduce the risk of diabetes complications by up to 60%.

A blood glucose meter is the best way to track the effects of your meals, food choices and exercise on your blood glucose levels. When you are sick or stressed, before and after sleeping, if dehydrated, and before driving are other times you may need to track your glucose.

By tracking your levels you can quickly take action to bring your blood sugar levels within range if needed. Your doctor will also use your blood glucose meter results to alter your treatment regimen, if needed. However, blood glucose meter results are not used to diagnose diabetes.

How Do Test Strips Work?

The OneTouch brand of meters measure the glucose content of a blood sample by means of an electrical current produced in the test strip. Glucose in the blood sample mixes with special chemicals in the test strip and a small electric current is produced and measured by the meter. The strength of this current calculates your blood glucose level.

Test results are "plasma-calibrated" (instead of whole-blood results), common with most meters. The results you receive from your doctor are also from the plasma. This makes it easier for patients and caregivers to compare meter results with laboratory tests. The meter measures the current, calculates your blood glucose level, displays the result, and stores it in memory.

Test results with the OneTouch Blood Glucose Monitoring System are presented in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Normal ranges for blood glucose in an adult is 80 to 120 mg/dL before a meal and less than 180 mg/dL after a meal.

After your glucose result appears, the meter will also display a Range Indicator Arrow below your glucose result to indicate if your result is below, above or within your range limits. If your readings are high or low, this may require immediate treatment according to your healthcare professional's recommendations.

Before Using the OneTouch Meter

Review the specific OneTouch Blood Glucose Monitoring System Owner’s Manual for all instructions on meter set-up and use, test strip and control solution use, battery information and care. Instructions are subject to change and may need review.

A review of meter display messages, what they mean, and what action you should take is also included in the Owner’s Manual.

The blood glucose monitoring system is intended to be used by a single patient and should not be shared.

Be sure to keep the owners manual in a safe spot for easy and quick reference. Contact OneTouch Customer Care at 1-800-227-8862 for further questions.

Is There an App for OneTouch Glucose Meters?

The OneTouch Reveal web application is compatible with the OneTouch Verio Reflect meter OneTouch Verio Flex meter, and the OneTouch UltraPlus Flex meter.

The OneTouch Reveal web app helps patients identify patterns, trends and trouble spots. Patients can upload their data and view a personalized home page designed to help get them more involved in their own care. They can download their glucose monitoring reports before doctor appointments for discussion.

The OneTouch Reveal draws a timeline of blood sugar events, highlighting when you have been repeatedly out of your target range. It creates a visual snapshot that connects your blood sugar with food, insulin, and activity. You can see and share your progress with your doctor, family, or caregivers, if you choose.

OneTouch meters can be connected to a computer via Bluetooth wireless technology or a USB to download your blood-glucose data to the app or other compatible software.

Do You Need Help With the Cost of Your Diabetes Supplies?

OneTouch diabetes supplies can be found at most retail pharmacies. Test strips and control solutions are sold separately and are not typically supplied in your blood glucose meter kit.

OneTouch may be able to help you make diabetes supplies more affordable. OneTouch test strips are usually covered by Medicare Part B and patients pay $0 with most supplemental health insurance.

Private insurance coverage usually has a low copay. All products are typically HSA-FSA eligible.

OneTouch supplies can also be ordered from various online sites. Visit the OneTouch website at OneTouch.com or call their customer service at 1-800-227-8862 for more information.

Learn More: What is Diabetes? An Overview

This is not all the information you need to know about OneTouch blood glucose meters or testing and does not take the place of your doctor’s directions for safe and effective use. Review the full user's manual information for your meter and discuss this information and any questions you have with your doctor or other health care provider.

Additional Resources

Sources

  • OneTouch. One Touch Meters. Accessed Nov. 22, 2023 at https://shop.onetouch.com/onetouch-meters
  • Lifescan.com. Accessed Nov. 22, 2023 at https://www.lifescan.com/

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Accuracy Studies

A total of 145 subjects were enrolled in accuracy study 1, but 23 subjects (16.0%) were withdrawn before meter testing began because the initial YSI 2300 measurement placed the subject into a glucose concentration bin that was already filled. In addition, one subject (0.7%) was excluded from the accuracy analysis because the hematocrit reading was an out-of-range reading (<30%), and eight subjects (5.5%) were excluded because their YSI 2300 results did not meet protocol-defined run-to-run criteria. The remaining 113 subjects (77.9%) were included in the accuracy analysis. The mean age of this cohort was 58.7 years. The majority of subjects were male (51.3%) and white (79.6%), and most had either type 1 (23.0%) or type 2 (69.0%) diabetes (). The reference plasma glucose measured by the YSI analyzer ranged from 33.0 to 531.5 mg/dl (1.8 to 29.5 mmol/liter), and the hematocrit ranged from 30.1% to 48.2%.

Table 1.

Accuracy study 1(n = 113)Accuracy study 2(n = 79)Age, mean (range), y58.7 (23–83)55.2 (18–84)Gender, n (%) Female55 (48.7)50 (63.3) Male58 (51.3)29 (36.7)Ethnicity, n (%) White90 (79.6)54 (68.4) Hispanic/Latino8 (7.1)9 (11.4) Black/African American5 (4.4)7 (8.9) Asian/Pacific Islander8 (7.1)7 (8.9) American Indian/Native Alaskan1 (0.9)1 (1.3) Other or unknown1 (0.9)1 (1.2)Type of diabetes, n (%) Type 126 (23.0)29 (36.7) Type 278 (69.0)50 (63.3) None9 (8.0)0 (0)YSI-measured plasma glucose Median (range), mg/dl131.3169.5(33.0–531.5)(66.8–356.3)Hematocrit (%) Median (range)40.038.9(30.1–48.2)(30.3–49.2)Open in a separate window

Using the OneTouch UltraVue, 6 subjects (5.3%) had glucose concentrations <50 mg/dl (<2.8 mmol/liter), 18 (15.9%) had concentrations 50 to 80 mg/dl (2.8 to 4.4 mmol/liter), 25 (22.1%) had concentrations >80 to 120 mg/dl (>4.4 to 6.7 mmol/liter), 31 (27.4%) had concentrations >120 to 200 mg/dl (>6.7 to 11.1 mmol/liter), 17 (15.0%) had concentrations >200 to 300 mg/dl (>11.1 to 16.7 mmol/liter), 11 (9.7%) had concentrations >300 to 400 mg/dl (>16.7 to 22.2 mmol/liter), and 5 (4.4%) had concentrations >400 mg/dl (>22.2 mmol/liter). The glucose concentrations measured using the OneTouch UltraVue were strongly correlated with the plasma YSI reference values over the wide range of concentrations tested. For the 678 tests (each patient's sample was tested on six meters), the relationship was defined by UltraVue = 0.972*YSI +1.15 mg/dl (Sy,x = 13.8 mg/dl, r = 0.99) (). Consensus error grids showed that 676 of the 678 tests (99.7%) fell within zone A (has no effect on clinical action). The other two test results (0.3%) fell within zone B (altered clinical action has little or no effect on outcome).

The bias analysis showed that the OneTouch UltraVue measured glucose concentrations fell within acceptable accuracy boundaries in 676 of the 678 tests (99.7%). All 114 samples (100%) with glucose concentrations <75 mg/dl (<4.2 mmol/liter) were within ±15 mg/dl (±0.8 mmol/liter) of the YSI reference value, and 562 of 564 samples (99.6%) with glucose concentrations ≥75 mg/dl(≥4.2 mmol/liter) were within ±20% of the YSI reference value (). Three error messages were obtained during accuracy testing, which indicated double application of the blood sample to the test strip, sample application before the meter was ready, and insufficient blood sample, respectively. In each case, the HCPs performed a successful test on the second attempt using the same meter and test strip lot.

In accuracy study 2, 81 diabetes patients were enrolled, and 79 (97.5%) were evaluable. Two subjects were excluded because the timing between specific tests exceeded protocol-defined limits. In addition, numerical results were not available for the second lancing in one subject. Thus evaluable results were available for 236 test sets (self-test and HCP test). The study cohort had a mean age of 55.2 years, and the majority of subjects were female (63.3%) and white (68.4%) (). Most had type 2 diabetes rather than type 1 (63.3% versus 36.7%). The study cohort had been performing SMBG for a median of 11 years (0.3 to 31 years) and was testing at a median frequency of three times per day (range 1 to 10). Forty-five patients (57.0%) had difficulty reading without wearing corrective lenses, and seven subjects (8.9%) had difficulty handling small objects. Most patients (72.2%) wereusing a OneTouch meter (Ultra, Ultra2, UltraSmart, or UltraMini). Plasma glucose measured by the YSI analyzer ranged from 66.8 to 356.3 mg/dl (3.7 to 19.8 mmol/liter), and hematocrit ranged from 30.3% to 49.2%.

The glucose concentrations in the self-tests performed by subjects and in the tests performed by HCPs using the OneTouch UltraVue were strongly correlated with the plasma glucose levels measured by the YSI reference method (). For the 236 self-tests (each subject tested three samples except for one subject who tested only two), the relationship was defined by UltraVue = 0.994*YSI −1.86 mg/dl (Sy,x = 15.5 mg/dl, r = 0.976). For the 236 tests conducted by HCPs, the relationship was defined by UltraVue = 0.993*YSI −4.97 mg/dl (Sy,x = 14.8 mg/dl, r = 0.977). The linear relationship between OneTouch UltraVue test results and YSI reference values was overlaid with consensus type 1 error grids to estimate the degree of clinical risk posed by an incorrect measurement (see ). Overall, 229 of the 236 self-tests performed by patients (97.0%) and 225 of the 236 tests performed by HCPs (95.3%) fell within zone A, signifying that any error in measurement compared with the reference value would have no effect on clinical action (). All other tests, including 7 self-tests (3.0%) and 11 HCP tests (4.7%) fell within zone B.

Table 2.

ZoneaSubject self-test (n = 236)HCP test (n = 236)A229 (97.0%)225 (95.3%)B7 (3.0%)11 (4.7)C00D00E00Open in a separate window

Bias plots were used to show the percentage of subject self-tests and HCP tests that fell within the boundary limits specified in ISO criteria (). Overall, 229 of the 236 self-tests (97.0%) and 233 of the 236 HCP tests (98.7%) fell within the accuracy boundaries specified in ISO criteria. Error messages indicating sensor damage or an incompletely filled confirmation window were obtained in six self-tests. In five of the six cases, the second attempt resulted in a successful measurement that was included in the accuracy analysis. Error messages for not enough blood were obtained in six HCP tests, and again, in five cases, a successful test was obtained on retesting.

OneTouch Blood Glucose Meters - Drugs.com

Performance Analysis of the OneTouch® UltraVue™ Blood ...

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